Your Five Senses

by tr223 5. February 2011 01:32


quality children's programming with your child.

Here are a few suggestions:

  • Sid the Science Kid: All My Senses - Sid and his friends learn about the five senses (sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch). Other episodes include: The Itchy Tag, What's That Smell?, Grandma's Glasses, and Too Much Noise.
  • The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot about That: Batty for Bats – Nick and Sally are playing a game of blindfolded tag but they can't seem to find each other? Luckily the Cat has a friend who is always able to find his way in the dark. After learning how to listen to find their way, blindfold tag has become a lot more fun!
  • Barney and Friends: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Senses - Luci introduces her new friend, Patty (who is visually impaired), to Barney, Michael, Tina and Kathy. Patty comments that a beautiful day can be experienced through more of one's senses than just sight. Michael's class is studying the five senses, which leads to fun songs and activities related to each of them. Perhaps most important, Patty shows the group that a child with blindness can do many things for him/herself and play right along with the others. Patty teaches the kids a rhyme and its corresponding hand movements...and she reads a story to Kathy, using braille.
  • Wild Kratts: Any Episode – As they learn about the world and science through animals, the characters actively apply their new knowledge to achieving their goals and completing the mission – whether it be exploring the never-before-seen deep sea in search of new creatures or finding out why worms come out from their underground home when it rains! Using their 5 senses is critical to their exploration and observations.

 

a story with your child. Try focusing on only one of the senses at a time.

Here are a few suggestions:

The Five Senses: Seeing

     

  • Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do You See? by Eric Carle
  • Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What do You See? by Eric Carle
  • Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What to You See? by Eric Carle

 

The Five Senses: Hearing

   

  • Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What do You Hear? By Eric Carle
  • I Hear by Helen Oxenbury
  • The Ear Book by Al Perkins

 

The Five Senses: Tasting

    

  • Your Tongue Can Tell by Vicki Cobb
  • Yummy Yucky by Leslie Patricelli
  • Look, Listen, Taste, Touch and Smell by Pamela Hill Nettleton

 

The Five Senses: Feel and Touch

   

  • The Sense of Touch by Elaine Landau
  • Soft and Smooth, Rough and Bumpy by Dana Meachen Rau and Rick Peterson
  • The Five Senses by Herve Tullet

     

The Five Senses: Smell

 

  • Sniff, Sniff by Dana Meachen Rau and Rick Peterson
  • Who's making that Smell? by Philip Hawthorn, Jenny Tyler, and Stephen Cartwright

     

a learning activity with your child

Here are a few suggestions:

The Five Senses: Seeing

  • Take your child on a walk and ask them what THEY see?
  • Make paper and crayons available to your child. Have them illustrate (draw pictures) of what THEY see.

The Five Senses: Hearing

  • Take your child to the zoo. Ask them what kinds of animals they hear. When you get home let them illustrate (draw pictures) of the animals THEY heard at the zoo.
  • Gather a variety of DURABLE household items. Let your child experiment with sound by letting them bang on the items with a wooden spoon. Include items such as a plastic bowl, a pan, a shoe, a rock. Be creative, try selecting items with your child, this can be a good way to teach them what is appropriate to play with and what is not.

 

The Five Senses: Tasting

  • Select a few different types of food for your child to taste. Combine a variety of flavors, sweet, salty, sour, bitter. Use a variety of fruits, vegetables, condiments, etc. Ask your child what THEIR favorite types of taste are. Do they like sweet or sour better? Do they like salty foods?       

(Since kids haven't been exposed to as many tastes as we have, they are not prepared for what they will taste, which heightens the entire sensory experience for them. Plus, the mouth is one of the earliest organs for exploration in a baby, which makes it feel natural for a preschooler when he takes part in a tasting activity. Introducing her to different tastes can also help her develop an interest in different foods.)

The Five Senses: Feel and Touch

  • Gather a variety of items and place them in paper bags. Have your child reach in and feel the object. Have them describe what the object feels like. By eliminated the sense of sight from this activity, it make take children a bit longer to describe the items.
  • Make the 'Touch and Feel' book with your child. Add additional pages if you like. cognitive_touchandfeel.pdf

     

The Five Senses: Smelling

  • Smelling Activity – Supplies: cotton balls, plastic cups, vanilla extract, almond extract, lemon extract, orange juice, grape juice, banana, peanut butter, cookie, etc.
  1. Place a few drops of flavorings on different cotton balls and place each in a separate cup.
  2. Place a small amount of different food items in separate cups.
  3. Let your child smell the different cups, without looking, and see if they can identify the different smells.

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