As part of KBYU Eleven’s commitment to kids and families, we offer resources that include ideas for activities to share with your children, advice on child development, blogs and forums, and tools to track your child’s progress. There are also links to fun sites where your child can safely play and learn.

PBS Kids Curriculum

by tr223 2. March 2011 01:18

KBYU Eleven – Helping parents help their children.

The PBS Kids Programs on KBYU Eleven are designed on research-based curriculum and address a wide variety of topics, age specific learning abilities, and promote a child's natural curiosity to help them learn. Below are links to pages that provide specific ways that parents can enhance their child's learning experiences through quality educational programs, explain the research behind these programs, and information about the educational philosophy of each program.

PBS Kids, for preschoolers, and PBS KIDS GO!, for early elementary school kids, inspire and nurture curiosity and a love of learning in children. KBYU Eleven offers all children – from every walk of life – opportunities for exploration and discovery through content on television, mobile devices, new media, the web and community programs.

Many Utah children have limited early opportunities to explore the worlds of literacy, language, math, science and the arts. Cultural, geographic and economic barriers stand between them and important learning opportunities. KBYU Eleven and PBS is helping overcome these barriers, expanding access to these worlds, giving children the tools they need to learn reading, science and math and providing them with a greater chance to reach their full potential.

Click on the link below to find:

  • Educational activities to do with children
  • Ways to expand learning by applying concepts from programs to everyday experiences and learning
  • Safe, fun, and educational interactive online games
  • The research behind the programs and educational objectives

Programs Currently Airing on KBYU Eleven

Ask Eleven: How Do I Find Quality Child Care?

by tr223 1. March 2011 22:45

Join Ask Eleven as they discuss how parents and caregivers can find quality child care. Learn what to look for and more importantly, what questions to ask. If you are interested in becoming a licensed provider, we have a few tips from the Utah State Department of Health.

Watch Ask Eleven: How Do I Find Quality Child Care?

Your Five Senses

by tr223 5. February 2011 01:32


quality children's programming with your child.

Here are a few suggestions:

  • Sid the Science Kid: All My Senses - Sid and his friends learn about the five senses (sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch). Other episodes include: The Itchy Tag, What's That Smell?, Grandma's Glasses, and Too Much Noise.
  • The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot about That: Batty for Bats – Nick and Sally are playing a game of blindfolded tag but they can't seem to find each other? Luckily the Cat has a friend who is always able to find his way in the dark. After learning how to listen to find their way, blindfold tag has become a lot more fun!
  • Barney and Friends: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Senses - Luci introduces her new friend, Patty (who is visually impaired), to Barney, Michael, Tina and Kathy. Patty comments that a beautiful day can be experienced through more of one's senses than just sight. Michael's class is studying the five senses, which leads to fun songs and activities related to each of them. Perhaps most important, Patty shows the group that a child with blindness can do many things for him/herself and play right along with the others. Patty teaches the kids a rhyme and its corresponding hand movements...and she reads a story to Kathy, using braille.
  • Wild Kratts: Any Episode – As they learn about the world and science through animals, the characters actively apply their new knowledge to achieving their goals and completing the mission – whether it be exploring the never-before-seen deep sea in search of new creatures or finding out why worms come out from their underground home when it rains! Using their 5 senses is critical to their exploration and observations.

 

a story with your child. Try focusing on only one of the senses at a time.

Here are a few suggestions:

The Five Senses: Seeing

     

  • Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do You See? by Eric Carle
  • Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What do You See? by Eric Carle
  • Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What to You See? by Eric Carle

 

The Five Senses: Hearing

   

  • Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What do You Hear? By Eric Carle
  • I Hear by Helen Oxenbury
  • The Ear Book by Al Perkins

 

The Five Senses: Tasting

    

  • Your Tongue Can Tell by Vicki Cobb
  • Yummy Yucky by Leslie Patricelli
  • Look, Listen, Taste, Touch and Smell by Pamela Hill Nettleton

 

The Five Senses: Feel and Touch

   

  • The Sense of Touch by Elaine Landau
  • Soft and Smooth, Rough and Bumpy by Dana Meachen Rau and Rick Peterson
  • The Five Senses by Herve Tullet

     

The Five Senses: Smell

 

  • Sniff, Sniff by Dana Meachen Rau and Rick Peterson
  • Who's making that Smell? by Philip Hawthorn, Jenny Tyler, and Stephen Cartwright

     

a learning activity with your child

Here are a few suggestions:

The Five Senses: Seeing

  • Take your child on a walk and ask them what THEY see?
  • Make paper and crayons available to your child. Have them illustrate (draw pictures) of what THEY see.

The Five Senses: Hearing

  • Take your child to the zoo. Ask them what kinds of animals they hear. When you get home let them illustrate (draw pictures) of the animals THEY heard at the zoo.
  • Gather a variety of DURABLE household items. Let your child experiment with sound by letting them bang on the items with a wooden spoon. Include items such as a plastic bowl, a pan, a shoe, a rock. Be creative, try selecting items with your child, this can be a good way to teach them what is appropriate to play with and what is not.

 

The Five Senses: Tasting

  • Select a few different types of food for your child to taste. Combine a variety of flavors, sweet, salty, sour, bitter. Use a variety of fruits, vegetables, condiments, etc. Ask your child what THEIR favorite types of taste are. Do they like sweet or sour better? Do they like salty foods?       

(Since kids haven't been exposed to as many tastes as we have, they are not prepared for what they will taste, which heightens the entire sensory experience for them. Plus, the mouth is one of the earliest organs for exploration in a baby, which makes it feel natural for a preschooler when he takes part in a tasting activity. Introducing her to different tastes can also help her develop an interest in different foods.)

The Five Senses: Feel and Touch

  • Gather a variety of items and place them in paper bags. Have your child reach in and feel the object. Have them describe what the object feels like. By eliminated the sense of sight from this activity, it make take children a bit longer to describe the items.
  • Make the 'Touch and Feel' book with your child. Add additional pages if you like. cognitive_touchandfeel.pdf

     

The Five Senses: Smelling

  • Smelling Activity – Supplies: cotton balls, plastic cups, vanilla extract, almond extract, lemon extract, orange juice, grape juice, banana, peanut butter, cookie, etc.
  1. Place a few drops of flavorings on different cotton balls and place each in a separate cup.
  2. Place a small amount of different food items in separate cups.
  3. Let your child smell the different cups, without looking, and see if they can identify the different smells.

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It’s Snow Fun

by tr223 4. February 2011 21:12

television that teaches

Here are some recommended programs to VIEW with your child 

  • The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That: Snowman's Land -Sally and Nick have just finished making a statue of the Cat in the Hat out of snow, but it's starting to melt! Goo dthing the Cat knows where to take the melting snowcat: to the cold and snowy north!
  • Sid the Science Kid: My Ice Pops - Sid wakes up and discovers that his ice pops melted! This sticky situation leads him to ask -- Why do things have to melt? After investigating at school, Sid learns that if liquids don't stay in a really cold place, they slowly melt over time. He also discovers that liquids can freeze into so lid ice and then melt right back into liquid.
  • Curious George: Ski Monkey - When a blizzard covers the country house with a foot of snow, George can't wait to go outside and play.
  • Cyberchase: Snow Day to be Exact - Hacker has frozen over Solaria by stealing the sunisphere that keeps the Cybersite in top condition. Will the kids stop Hacker in time to save Selaria?
  • Super Why!: 'Twas the Night Before Christmas - The Super Readers are on a special mission to find out why Santa Claus visits children on Christmas. To find the answer to their question, the Super Readers fly into the classic story "'Twas the Night Before Christmas". While in the story, the Super Readers meet Santa and discover that he visits all the children because it makes both him and them happy.


an age-appropriate storybook on a similar topic

Select a story to READ with your child. Here are a few suggestions.

     

  • The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats - Peter wakes up to find the world covered in snow-crisp, clean, and white. Excitedly, Peter ventures out to play. His feet make a variety of tracks, and when he hits a snow-laden tree with a stick, the snow falls off-plop! onto his head. Keats's sparse collage illustrations capture the wonder and beauty a snowy day can bring to a small child.
  • Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Beuhner - Have you ever built a snowman and discovered the next day that his grin has gotten a little crooked, or his tree-branch arms have moved? And you've wondered . . . what do snowmen do at night?
  • There Was A Cold Lady Who Swallowed Some Snow by Lucille Colandro - There was a cold lady who swallowed some snow. I don't know why she swallowed some snow. Perhaps you know. This time, the old lady is swallowing everything from snow to a pipe, some coal, a hat, and more! With rollicking, rhyming text and funny illustrations, this lively version will appeal to young readers with every turn of the page. And this time, there's a surprise at the end no reader will be able to guess!
  • Snowflake Bentley by Jacqueline Briggs Martin - From the time he was a small boy, Wilson Bentley thought of the icy crystals as small miracles. And he determined that one day his camera would capture for others the wonder of the tiny crystals.
  • Snow by Cynthia Rylant - Cynthia Rylant's lyrical descriptions of the sights and feelings evoked by falling snow blend gorgeously with the rich and beautiful world created by Lauren Stringer's illustrations, in which a young girl, her friend, and her grandmother enjoy the many things a snowy day has to offer.

 

a hands-on activity to reinforce learning

Select an activity to DO with your child. Here is a suggestion.

  • Snowball Experiment - Have your child make snowballs (some small, some medium, some large) and place them in zip top bags. Have your child predict what will happen. You may want to place some near a heat source for more challenging predictions. Have your child predict how long it will take for the different sized snowballs to melt. Record the predictions on a graph in one color marker, and the actual results on the graph in another color marker.
  • Peter's Movement, Gross Motor and Listening Skills – After reading The Snowy Day, have your child stand while you read the story and him act out different parts of the story (dragging his feet, dragging a stick on his path, climbing a mountains, etc.). Then go outside and do it again and again. Take pictures of your 'snow angel'.
  • If I were a Snowman . . . – If you were a snowman, what would you do at night? Turn out the lights and get some flashlights. Help your child act out what they would do if they were a snowman at night. Would he jump on the bed, play hide-and-seek, or eat an ice cream cone?

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What About Spring?

by tr223 3. February 2011 21:09

television that teaches

 

Here are some recommended programs to VIEW with your child 

  • Curious George George Digs Worms - The countryside catches worm-racing fever when George's prize worm enters a championship race.
  • Sid the Science Kid The Dirt on Dirt - Sid and his friends learn about the importance of dirt in making things grow.
  • The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That Nest Best Thing – Nick and Sally have found some bird eggs in their backyard, but their nest is destroyed. Where are they going to keep them? The Cat in the Hat brings them to an expert nest builder, Mrs. Robin, who show the children how to build a nest especially for the homeless eggs.
  • Super Why! Peter Rabbit - The Super Readers fly into "Peter Rabbit," where they try to stop the bunny from munching the vegetables in people's gardens.
  • Between the Lions The Carrot Seed / The Empty Pot - A seed that's planted and watered usually sprouts if you're patient, but what happens when the flower seed you plant for the Emperor doesn't grow?

 

an age-appropriate storybook on a similar topic

Select a story to READ with your child. Here are a few suggestions.

  • That's What Happens When It's Spring! By Elaine W. Good – The sights, sounds, colors, and special feelings of spring come alive as they are experienced through the eyes of a youngster.
  • It's Spring! By Linda Glaser – A child observes the arrival of spring and its effects on plants and animals (includes suggestions for nature study projects).
  • The Boy Who Didn't Believe in Spring by Lucille Clifton – In the middle of the city, two young friends set out to find Spring. Their search ends in a most unlikely but utterly convincing discovery.
  • Spring by Nuria Roca – Large and beautiful color illustrations on every page of this book will appeal especially to early grades boys and girls. Kids will also love having the simply written descriptive text read to them as they gaze at the charming pictures –and as they get just a little older; they'll be able to read the text by themselves.

 

a hands-on activity to reinforce learning

Select an activity to DO with your child. Here is a suggestion.

  • Signs of Spring Scavenger Hunt – Take your child on a scavenger hunt to search for signs of spring. Consider going to the park, walking through your neighborhood, or around your own yard. Talk about how you know, what you are seeing are signs that spring is coming.
  • Signs of Spring Book - Help your child be an author. Decide how you want to "illustrate" your book. Do you want to take pictures? Do you want to draw what you see in a small notebook? Do you want to collect signs of spring? After you have decided how to help your child illustrate, go on a walk to collect the images of spring. Talk about what you see. When you get home, help your child create a book about what you saw on your walk.

 

 

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Exploring Emotions

by tr223 27. December 2010 20:45

television that teaches

Here are some recommended programs to VIEW with your child.

  • Arthur What Scared Sue Ellen
  • Cyberchase Spheres of Fear
  • Word World Hoppin' with the Bug Band, Duck's First sleepover OR My Fuzzy Valentine
  • Thomas and Friends Feeling
  • Sesame Street Bird's Nest Sale OR Grouch News Network
  • Super Why! Jack and the Beanstalk

 

an age-appropriate storybook on a similar topic

Select a story to READ with your child. Here are a few suggestions.

  • Feelings by Aliki
  • Glad Monsters, Sad Monster, a book about Feelings by Ed Emberley    
  • Today I Feel Silly, and Other Moods that Make My Day by Jamie Lee Curtis

 

a hands-on activity to reinforce learning

Select an activity to DO with your child. Here is a suggestion.

  • Help your child create a book of their feelings. Have them illustrate (draw) pictures of how they feel. This can be accomplished in many ways.
    • Let them choose a COLOR they feel like and draw a picture using only that color or have them draw what they look like when they are experiencing that particular emotion.
    • Have them draw a picture of what makes the feel BETTER when they are experiencing certain emotions.

 

  • Help your child create a paper bag monster that shows how they are feeling. Provide several items to help them create their Feelings Puppet (construction paper, glue, crayons, yarn, etc).

 

  • Take your child on an Emotions Dress-Up hunt to find articles of clothing that help to express how they are feeling. Maybe it is a certain color, pattern, or texture. Maybe it a variety of types of clothing. Let them be creative and take a picture of their OUTFIT when you are done.

 

 

 

      

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Fun with Color

by tr223 27. December 2010 18:57

television that teaches

Here are some recommended programs to VIEW with your child   

    

  • Between the Lions: Red Hat, Green Hat Leona's new hat stirs up trouble in the library.
  • Curious George Color Me Monkey Mr. Glass is looking for a one-of-a-kind painting for his lobby and Mr. Zoobel knows just where to find such art - at the zoo, naturally!

 

an age-appropriate storybook on a similar topic

Select a story to READ with your child. Here are a few suggestions.

        

  • Blue Goose by Nancy Tafuri - When Farmer Gray goes away, Blue Goose, Red Hen, Yellow Chick, and White Duck decide to paint their black and white barnyard. Red Hen paints the barn red. White Duck paints the fence white. When Blue Goose and Yellow Chick mix their paints together they make green for grass and trees. By the time Farmer Gray returns the farm is filled with color. Focusing on primary and secondary colors, this story is a fun and friendly way for children to learn basic concepts.
  • Cat's Colors by Jane Cabrera – What is Cat's favorite color? Is it green, like the grass where he likes to walk, or yellow, like the sand on a sunny beach? Children who are learning new colors can join in Cat's fun as he explores the colors all around him.
  • Where is the Green Sheep? By Mem Fox - There are red sheep and blue sheep, wind sheep and wave sheep, scared sheep and brave sheep, but where is the green sheep?

 

a hands-on activity to reinforce learning

Select an activity to DO with your child. Here is a suggestion.

Edible Finger Paint Color Mixing Activity

  1. Prepare 1 box of instant white chocolate pudding according to package directions
  2. Divide pudding into three bowls, then using liquid food coloring, prepare:
  • 1 bowl of blue pudding
  • 1 bowl of red pudding
  • 1 bowl of yellow pudding.

Using a sheet of wax paper taped to the counter, let your child mix the primary colors ( red, yellow, blue) to create secondary colors (green, orange, purple) and paint a picture. Licking fingers is okay and when done you can use your fingers to eat your painting.

       

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